National Open: Round 8 Pairing

An exciting round ended last night where people witnessed the loss of Hani Samieh against the Kuwaiti Champ, Bader Al Hajeri. Unfortunately, I wasn’t there to see the game. I arrived at 9:30pm, when just about the rest of the players were leaving the club. Luckily, I saw Bader and I asked if I could have the score sheet. So today, the chess fans will have a new addition to the site; The first official full-game post. And it is between Bader Al Hajeri vs. Hani Sameih. Al Hajeri played 1. e4 and Sameih opted for the sicilain defence. The game will be posted underneath the pairings for the second-to-last round (Round 8). Remember, this tournament only has 9 rounds. And until now, we have 3 players with a score of 6.0 pts from 7 rounds. And 3 others with 5.5pts. Basically, the players on the top 3 boards have ony one loss each! After Sunday evening, that will definitely change! We should get an idea who would be on the top 5 after Sundays games.

Without further adieu, here’s the Round 8 pairings (with scores):

  1. Hani Samieh vs. Dennis Poliquit (6.0 pts)
  2. Ferdinand Bugay (5.5 pts) vs. Bader Al Hajeri
  3. Ahmad Jad vs. Abdulmohsin Ali
  4. Dr. Ahmad vs. Taher Al Khateeb (5.0 pts)
  5. Florentino Silao vs. Khaled Khan
  6. Ahmad Hosni vs. Waleed Al Awadhi (4.5 pts)
  7. Eid Mohammad vs. Asfand Khan
  8. Ferdinand Laming vs. Basir Cosain (4.0 pts)
  9. Fayiq Kanan vs. Mohammad Jabr
  10. Edgar Benities  vs. Emmanuel Ygpuara
  11. Faizur Rahman vs. Naser Maqsed
  12. Samuel Santos vs. Imad Abdullatief
  13. Hamada Al Wakiel vs. Al Sayed Anwar
  14. Nizar Kanan vs. Hamdi Faraj (3.5 pts)
  15. Waheed Hilal vs. Basim Zaki
  16. Khaled Hashem (3.o pts) vs. Sajan Varguese
  17. Ahmad Abdou vs. Omran Al Moussawi
  18. Kennith Tasadao vs. Imad Fawzi
  19. Abdulrahman Al Ibrahim vs. Bader AlKhaldi
  20. Abdulwahab Al Atiqi vs. AbdulAziz Al Sinafi (2.5 pts)
  21. Nasir Bahamany vs. Amin Yamout (2.0 pts)
  22. Nanda Kumar vs. Zaid Marafi
  23. Abdulmohsin Al Meshari vs. Hashem Hussain (1.5 pts)
  24. Oliver John 1:0 BYE

SCORE SHEER FOR:

Players: Bader Al Hajeri (white) vs. Hani Sameih (Black)

Details- Date: February 18th, 2010 / Location: Kuwait Chess Federation / Event: National Tournament 2010

  1. e4 c5
  2. Nf3 d6
  3. d4 cxd4
  4. Qxd4 Nc6
  5. Bb5 Bd7
  6. Bxc6 Bxc6
  7. Nc3 Nf6
  8. Bg5 e6
  9. 0-0-0 Be7
  10. Rhe1 0-0
  11. Kb1 Qc7
  12. Qd2 Rfd8
  13. Nd4 a6
  14. f3 Rac8
  15. g4 b5
  16. h4 Qb7
  17. Nce2 b4
  18. Ng3 a5
  19. Rg1 Ne8
  20. Nh5 Qd7
  21. Nf5!! exf5
  22. gxf5 f6
  23. Bh6! Bf8
  24. Bxg7! Bxg7
  25. Rxg7 Qxg7
  26. Nxg7 Nxg7
  27. Qh6 Rf8
  28. Rxd6 Ne8
  29. Rd1 Rc7
  30. Rd8 Rg7
  31. b3 Rff7
  32. Qe3 Ra7
  33. Qc5 Rac7
  34. h5 h6
  35. e5! fxe5
  36. f6! Rgf7
  37. Qxe5 Kf8
  38. Qf4 Kg8
  39. Qxh6 Bd7
  40. Qg6+ Kf8
  41. h6 Bb5
  42. Qf5 Rb7
  43. Qc5+ Kg8
  44. Qe5 Kf8
  45. f4 Rfc7
  46. f7 Rxf7
  47. Rxe8!! Bxe8
  48. Qh8+! Ke7
  49. h7 Rb5
  50. Qd4! Rxh7
  51. Qe4+ Kd6
  52. Qxh7 Bd7
  53. Qe4 Bf5
  54. Qd4+ Kc6
  55. Qf6+ Kc7
  56. Qe7+ Kc6
  57. Qe8+! Kb6
  58. a3 Rc5
  59. axb4 Bxf7
  60. Kb2 axb4
  61. Qb8+ Kc6
  62. Qc8+ Kb6
  63. Qxc5+! Kxc5
  64. Kxc2 Kd4
  65. f5 Ke5
  66. Kd3 Kxf5
  67. Kc4 Ke6
  68. Kxb4 Kd6
  69. Kb5 Kc7
  70. Ka6 Kb8
  71. b4 Ka8
  72. b5 Kb8
  73. Kb6 Ka8
  74. Kc7 RESIGNS 1:0

 

Advertisements

About Khaled

I am a chess fan who would like to see chess grow in Kuwait. I am sure there are a lot of people like me here and this site is for you.

11 thoughts on “National Open: Round 8 Pairing

  1. Nasser AlMakseed says:

    Mabrook, Bader AlHajiri, you played a wounderful game against Sameh,H and it will be in our mind for a long time.
    I hope you win this tournament !

  2. attakero says:

    hello all chess loving players here in kuwait, lets play all in Kuwait room in http://www.chesscube.com

  3. eman says:

    congrats to bader……this man is dangerous specially end game!!!!! oliver andyan ako lagi kami nila khalid….

  4. attakero says:

    allow me to post this very interesting game hope you guys like it!

    Today’s games

    GM Viswanathan Anand ( India)-GM Vladimir Kramnik (Russia), Corus A, Wijk aan Zee 2010

    1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nf6 The Petroff Defense, a signal that Kramnik was content to draw. He led the tournament by a half-point before this penultimate-round game. 3 Nxe5 d6 4 Nf3 Nxe4 5 d4 d5 6 Bd3 Nc6 7 0-0 Be7 8 c4 White has nearly abandoned the old main line, 8 Re1 Bg4 9 c3 f5. Nb4 9 Be2 0-0 10 Nc3 Bf5 11 a3 Nxc3 12 bxc3 Nc6 13 Re1 Re8 14 cxd5 Qxd5 15 Bf4 A popular position with a drawish reputation. Rac8 After 15 . . . Bd6 16 c4 Qe4 17 Be3, White may gain time with c4-c5. 16 h3 Discouraging 16 . . . Bf6, as 17 Nh2 Qa5 18 Bd2 Rcd8 19 Bf3 h6 20 Ng4 Bxg4 21 hxg4 gave White an edge in Kramnik – Anand, Wijk aan Zee 2003. Be4 17 Qc1 New. A round earlier, Kramnik had drawn as Black against Shirov after 17 Nd2!? Bxg2 18 Bg4 Bh1 19 f3 Bh4 20 Re4!? f5 21 Kxh1 fxg4 22 hxg4 Qf7. In 2008, Kramnik drew as Black against Ivanchuk after 17 Be3 Na5 18 Nd2 Bf5 19 c4 Qd7 20 Nf3 Bf6 21 Rc1 c5. Na5 18 Qe3 Bf8?! Losing ground in the center. Black would have few worries after 18 . . . Bf5 19 Ne5 c5. 19 c4! Qd8 As 19 . . . Nxc4?? drops a piece to 20 Bxc4 Qxc4 21 Nd2 Qd5 22 Nxe4 f5 23 Nc3. 20 Ne5 Bf5 21 Qc3 b6 22 Rad1 Qf6?! Black’s position deteriorates after this second slip. Instead, 22 . . . f6 23 Ng4 Bd6 limits White to a minimal advantage. 23 Qg3 Nc6 Possibly 23 . . . c5 24 d5 Bd6 improves, although the computer likes White after 25 Bh5 g6 26 Re3. 24 Ng4 Qg6 25 d5 Na5 26 Bxc7! A powerful exchange sacrifice. White gets nothing from 26 Ne3 Qxg3 27 Bxg3 Bd7. Bc2 27 Rc1 Nb3 28 Rxc2 Qxc2 29 Nh6+ Kh8 30 Nxf7+ Kg8 31 Nh6+ Kh8 32 Nf7+ A first for Anand, the legendarily quick calculator who claimed he had never repeated moves to gain time on the clock. Kg8 33 Nh6+ Kh8 34 Be5! White’s swarming pieces will overwhelm Black. For example, White refutes 34 . . . Qd2 by 35 Nf7+ Kg8 36 Bc3 Qc2 37 Ne5, followed by the Bishop’s entry at g4 or h5. Qg6 35 Bg4 Rxc4? Dropping material. Black’s last hope is 35 . . . Rcd8 36 Nf5 Nc5. 36 Qxb3 Rxe5 If 36 . . . Re4, then 37 Rxe4 Qxe4 38 Nf7+ Kg8 39 d6 sets up a fatal discovery. 37 Rxe5 Rc1+ 38 Kh2 Bd6 Black cannot solve his back-rank problem after either 38 . . . Qxh6 39 Re8 Qf6 40 Qf3 or 38 . . . gxh6 39 Re6! Qg7 40 Re8. 39 f4 Bxe5 No better is 39 . . . gxh6 40 Qb2! Bxe5 41 Qxe5+ Qg7, when the game might conclude 42 d6 Rc5 43 Qe8+ Qg8 44 d7 Rd5 45 Be6. 40 fxe5 gxh6 Or 40 . . . Qxh6 41 Qf3! g6 42 d6. 41 Qe3 White’s pawns are unstoppable. He can overcome the flimsy blockade 41 . . . Rc5 42 d6 h5 43 Bf3 Qe6 by 44 Qd4 Rc8 45 Bd5, or 44 . . . Rc4 45 Qd5. Qb1 42 d6 Rh1+ 43 Kg3 Re1 44 Qf4 Rf1 45 Bf3, Black Resigns.

  5. Anonymous says:

    Where is the last round pairing? The last round almost starts but still the pairing was not posted? 1st to 8th round the pairing was posted a day before the game starts.

  6. Khaled says:

    Hi, Sorry about not posting anything for a while. i missed the final round as well. Busy with work and other things too.

    Taher will probably post the final results in the end. Or someone else, I wont be able to for at least a week.

  7. Dennis says:

    Khalid how are you? Hope you will post the result of the tournament today before going abroad hehehehe. its an honor to be known to my friends outside kuwait that im the champion. thank you very much!

  8. Anonymous says:

    terrible game…. so many mistakes by both players…hsameih and bader…… white made lesser mistakes so had a clear advantage right from the start…. game should have been over in 35 moves !!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s